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Identify The Differences Amount UPVC, CPVC, and PVC pipes

TIME 2019-10-31 15:24:42Reading:163

 What Is The Difference Between UPVC And PVC Pipes? 


UPVC and PVC pipes are very similar in many ways, the difference in them is how they are used. Regular PVC pipes are used in situations where resistance to corrosive materials is desired. UPVC is used in situations where a sturdy low maintenance material is desired. It can also be noted that one major difference does exist between the two, PVC is more flexible than UPVC making it a better choice for a number of applications where that property is valued. And one more major difference is that PVC is most often used for plumbing while UPVC can be used for a wide variety of purposes such as decorative protective trim.

PVC is popular due to its relatively low cost and is valued for its chemical inertness and flame and smoke retardant properties. It is used for a wide variety of plumbing applications such as pumps, filters, duct, strainers, and valves. PVC has amazing strength and can withstand high impacts and can be used in hot and cold low pressure systems. It is a great substitute for metal in places where corrosion is causing highmaintenance costs.

UPVC is most often the choice of the building industry as a low-maintenance and relatively low costbuilding material. It can come in a wide range of finishes as well as colors and as such is often used as a substitute for wood in places such as window frames, siding, and weatherboarding. It can also serve the traditional PVC roles in plumbing, waste pipes, gutters, and downpipes. 

Both PVC and UPVC are crucial in helping contracting builders and construction companies stay under budget while doing a solid and reliable job in new construction projects as well maintenance jobs of allshapes and types where strong and sturdy drainage and plumbing solutions are required.

The Differences Between UPVC & PVC Pipes

To the casual observer, there's little difference between PVC pipe and uPVC pipe. Both are plastic pipe used extensively in building. Beyond the superficial similarities, the two types of pipe are manufactured differently and thus have different properties and slightly different applications in building and other industrial processes and most repair-work exposure to plastic pipe is to PVC rather than uPVC. 

What is the difference between UPVC AND CPVC AND PVC pies, anyone can tell appropriate use of each pipes?

CPVC is a popular engineering material due to its relatively low cost, high glass transition temperature, high heat distortion temperature, chemical inertness, and flame and smoke properties. 

CPVC is used in a variety of industrial applications where a high functional temperature and resistance to corrosive chemicals are desirable. Besides pipe and fittings, it is used in pumps, valves, strainers, filters, tower packing, and duct, as well as sheet for fabrication into storage tanks, fume scrubbers, large diameter duct, and tank lining.

Pipe:
In use as plumbing materials, CPVC exhibits comparatively high impact and tensile strength and is non-toxic.

In pressurized systems, it can be used with fluids up to 80°C and higher in low-pressure systems. It does require specialized solvent cement for assembly. Depending on local building codes, it can be used in hot and cold water systems as well as hot and cold chemical distribution systems in conditions where metal pipe is not indicated. 

The principal mechanical difference between CPVC and PVC is that CPVC is significantly more ductile, allowing greater flexure and crush resistance. Additionally, the mechanical strength of CPVC makes it a viable candidate to replace many types of metal pipe in conditions where metal's susceptibility to corrosion limits its use.

CPVC can withstand corrosive water at temperatures greater than PVC, typically 40°C to 50°C (70°F to 90°F) higher, contributing to its popularity as a material for water piping systems in residential as well as commercial construction. 


uPVC or Rigid PVC is often used in the building industry as a low-maintenance material, particularly in Ireland and the UK, and in the United States where it is known as vinyl, or vinyl siding.

The material comes in a range of colors and finishes, including a photo-effect wood finish, and is used as a substitute for painted wood, mostly for window frames and sills when installing double glazing in new buildings, or to replace older single glazed windows. It has many other uses including fascia, and siding or weatherboarding. The same material has almost entirely replaced the use of cast iron for plumbing and drainage, being used for waste pipes, drainpipes, gutters and downpipes. Pipe:
In use as plumbing materials, CPVC exhibits comparatively high impact and tensile strength and is non-toxic.

In pressurized systems, it can be used with fluids up to 80°C and higher in low-pressure systems. It does require specialized solvent cement for assembly. Depending on local building codes, it can be used in hot and cold water systems as well as hot and cold chemical distribution systems in conditions where metal pipe is not indicated. 

The principal mechanical difference between CPVC and PVC is that CPVC is significantly more ductile, allowing greater flexure and crush resistance. Additionally, the mechanical strength of CPVC makes it a viable candidate to replace many types of metal pipe in conditions where metal's susceptibility to corrosion limits its use.

CPVC can withstand corrosive water at temperatures greater than PVC, typically 40°C to 50°C (70°F to 90°F) higher, contributing to its popularity as a material for water piping systems in residential as well as commercial construction. 

uPVC or Rigid PVC is often used in the building industry as a low-maintenance material, particularly in Ireland and the UK, and in the United States where it is known as vinyl, or vinyl siding.

The material comes in a range of colors and finishes, including a photo-effect wood finish, and is used as a substitute for painted wood, mostly for window frames and sills when installing double glazing in new buildings, or to replace older single glazed windows. It has many other uses including fascia, and siding or weatherboarding. The same material has almost entirely replaced the use of cast iron for plumbing and drainage, being used for waste pipes, drainpipes, gutters and downpipes.

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